Yes, I loved fireworks when I was a kid, and I blew up more than my fair share of Black Cat firecrackers and M60s. But that’s before I understood the environmental impact of what I was doing. I know if I’d had less damaging ways to celebrate I would have had just as much fun (seriously, what child wouldn’t have a great time throwing eggs that smash into a flurry of confetti?) If you want to be extra-considerate of nature, make sure whatever you choose is as eco-friendly and biodegradable as possible; light-up poi and other battery-operated light toys can have years of use, and make sure your confetti eggs don’t include plastic-based glitter or other non-biodegradables.

I realize that I didn’t cover related topics, such as how fireworks can cause massive fires. Wildfire is a topic I’d like to give its own comic down the line; needless to say, another reason to avoid fireworks is the potential for accidentally setting things alight (such as the Eagle Creek fire in Oregon in 2018.) I do also acknowledge that smaller fireworks fo the sort most people use at home, like firecrackers and smoke bombs, are less of an impact individually than mortars, but they still contribute a lot of pollution on their own, and are likely an even bigger source given how many people buy them each year.

Also, here are a few links on the ecological impact of fireworks, in case you need more talking points when discussing this with others:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2019/12/31/festive-fireworks-create-harmful-pall-of-pollution/#188f90852853

https://theconversation.com/our-prettiest-pollutant-just-how-bad-are-fireworks-for-the-environment-52451

www.terrapass.com/fireworks-impact-environment

https://www.robinage.com/environment/the-ill-effects-of-firecrackers.htm

Finally, if you thought the toad on panel four was cute, you can get her as a sticker at http://wyntkan.redbubble.com!